DIY Pet Stain Removal – Does it Work?

Team Pets

If you have pets that live inside your home, you have probably had the occasional accident on your carpet or upholstery. You love your fur babies like family, but you don’t love the presents they sometimes leave you. When you look up how to clean it you will find plenty of recipes for all natural pet stain removers you can make at home or other DIY (do it yourself) options. There’s a wealth of information out there, but does any of it really work? 

Here’s a breakdown of the most popular options for DIY pet stain removal.  

Vinegar

One of the most popular natural cleaners, vinegar is useful around the house for many different cleaning options. However, it is not helpful for pet stains. Both vinegar and pet urine are very acidic. In order to neutralize an acid, it is necessary to use a base or a neutral substance. Vinegar simply adds to the odor and encourages your pet to continue to urinate in the same area. 

Baking Soda

The next most popular natural household cleaner is baking soda. Baking soda is known to neutralize or absorb odors, which it can do in some cases (such as in your refrigerator). However, when it comes to pet stains it may temporarily remove odor, but it will fail to remove the underlying stain that has seeped into the carpet and padding or the upholstery and stuffing of your furniture. The stain will remain, potentially show up later, and continue to smell. And the furry one responsible for the smell will easily detect it and consider that spot their own personal bathroom. 

Dish Soap

Some people recommend dish soap, as it is known for loosening oily substances from fabric. However, dish soap is heavy and will soak deep into carpet or upholstery. It is difficult to remove because it can’t be effectively rinsed out of the material. The dish soap merely clings to the stain, further embedding it in the fabric. 

Laundry Detergent

Laundry detergent is made for fabric, so it should work on upholstery, right? Unfortunately, no. Even diluted laundry detergent can be too concentrated and may even cause a new stain on your carpet. It may also be too harsh for some upholstery. Like dish soap, it is difficult to rinse out of a stationary object that cannot be put in the washing machine. 

Hydrogen Peroxide

Hydrogen peroxide is a natural bleaching agent. It is likely to take the color out of your carpet or upholstery fabric along with the stain, if it removes the stain at all. 

Pet Stain Cleaning Products 

There are a variety of products on the market that are designed especially for pet stains, and most of them focus on neutralizing the odor. However, they may remove the odor but not the stain, and many times the odor still remains, at least enough for the offending animal to recognize it and repeat the behavior. 

Carpet Shampooers and Wet Vacs 

You can purchase or rent carpet shampooers and wet vacs that are designed to deep clean your carpet and remove stains. These can help and are more effective than any of the above cleaners. However, it is possible that without proper experience, you may use them incorrectly and cause damage to your carpet and fabric. It is easy to use too much water and soak the carpet and padding or the upholstery and stuffing in a way that makes it difficult to dry. If it stays wet too long, mold or mildew may start to grow. 

Try a Professional Carpet and Upholstery Cleaning Service 

Don’t waste time and hassle on DIY pet stain removal. The best way to completely remove tough pet stains is with the help of a professional carpet and upholstery cleaning service. First Class Carpet and Upholstery Cleaning has the expertise as well as the right equipment and cleaning products to remove old or new pet stains and the odors that come with them. With our help you can enjoy your pets without stressing about their messes. Trust your valuable rugs and furniture pieces to the experts at First Class Carpet and Upholstery Cleaning. 

Call 845-224-5651 today to schedule or request your free estimate. We look forward to helping you restore your carpet, fine rugs, and furniture.